Games > Halo > Forum > Halo General Discussion > Excellent NIC config to reduce lag and warping.
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Forum Home > Halo General Discussion > Excellent NIC config to reduce lag and warping.
halowaloPM
#1
Excellent NIC config to reduce lag and warping.
Jun 20, 2017 1:40 PM
Joined: Jun 09, 2017
Posts: 87
I'd like to share something that i saw on a team's forum right here on GT: this is some good stuff, the settings work well and reduce packet loss and i thought it may help anyone who plays halo. Shout out to all the players here!

The post~

http://www.gametracker.com/clan/Team3sk/forum.php?thread=128553
halo walo
robin3skPM
#2
Jun 20, 2017 3:09 PM
Joined: Jun 06, 2015
Posts: 1795
Thanks for sharing this post. I did figure that these settings might make a small difference. It isn't noticeable but there is a deduction in warp/lag.

However; servers do lag due to poor connection, DDOS attacks etc. This isn't preventable.
Client-sided lag is common and does affect other players. A biped teleporting all over the map is hard to consistently hit. Lead compensation, latency distance + other players lag makes it difficult to be a precise shooter.

These settings will make you warp less but do note that if your connection is bad, you'll still lag.




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arcticbeerPM
#3
Jun 28, 2017 7:35 AM
Joined: May 22, 2017
Posts: 46
I saw this post and I forgot to ask a question...

I have a wireless connection. It's not a desktop. No Ethernet, can you help me configure the settings there??
Antarticbeer.
robin3skPM
#4
Jun 28, 2017 7:55 AM
Joined: Jun 06, 2015
Posts: 1795
arcticbeer wrote:
I saw this post and I forgot to ask a question...
I have a wireless connection. It's not a desktop. No Ethernet, can you help me configure the settings there??

You should've read the entire post... I did include settings for wifi.

These were listed in the post:

Intel(R) Centrino(R) Wireless-N 2230 Settings (wifi)
802.11n Channel Width for band 2: Auto
802.11n Mode: Enabled
Ad Hoc Channel 802.11b/g: 11
Ad Hoc QoS Mode: WMM Disabled
ARP offload for WoWLAN: Enabled
Bluetooth(R) AMP: Disabled
Fat Channel Intolerant: Disabled
GTK rekeying for WoWLAN: Enabled
Mixed Mode Protection: CTS-to-self Enabled
NS offload for WoWLAN: Enabled
Roaming Aggressiveness: 3. Medium - tested lowest and highest multiple times, medium always came out best
Slep on WoWLAN Disconnect: Disabled
Transmit Power: 5. Highest
Wake on Magic Packet: Enabled
Wake on Pattern Match: Enabled
Wireless Mode: 1. 802.11b (or 3. 802.11b/g, sometimes 1. 802.11b causes limited wifi)


Wireless isn't even recommend for gaming.

Ethernet is just plain faster than Wi-Fi—there’s no getting around that fact. But the real-world differences are smaller than you might think. Wi-Fi has gotten significantly faster over the last few years, thanks to new standards like 802.11ac and 802.11n, which offer maximum speeds of 866.7 Mb/s and 150 Mb/s, respectively. Even though this is a maximum speed for all your wireless devices to share (and you likely won’t get those speeds in the real world), Wi-Fi has become good enough to handle most of our daily tasks.On the other hand, a wired Ethernet connection can theoretically offer up to 10 Gb/s, if you have a Cat6 cable. The exact maximum speed of your Ethernet cable depends on the type of Ethernet cable you’re using. However, even the Cat5e cable in common use supports up to 1 Gb/s. And, unlike with Wi-Fi, that speed is consistent.

Ethernet will, however, affect the speed between devices on your network. For example, if you want to transfer files as fast as possible between two computers in the house, Ethernet will be faster than Wi-Fi. Your Internet connection isn’t involved in this, so it’s all up to the maximum speeds your local network hardware can provide.
Here are just a couple of good examples of when this local speed might be important:

(1) If you have multiple devices that back up to a NAS, backup server, or shared hard drive, backups will go faster over an Ethernet connection.
(2) If you have devices that stream from a media server on your network (like Plex or Kodi), an Ethernet connection will give you a considerable boost in streaming quality.

If you’re curious about the difference in local file transfer speed, try transferring a large file between two computers while they’re both connected to Ethernet and while they’re both connected to Wi-Fi. You should see a speed difference there.

The conclusive thought is: GET ETHERNET.




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Last edited by: robin3sk Jun 28, 2017 8:12 AM
robin3skPM
#5
Jun 28, 2017 8:23 AM
Joined: Jun 06, 2015
Posts: 1795
It's a similar theory that applies to input lag with wireless devices; wireless mouse, keyboard etc.

Most wireless mice use radio frequency (RF) technology to communicate information to your computer.
And Radio Frequency is in the range of around 3 kHz to 300 GHz.
1 Hertz ( 1Hz ) is one full oscillation in one second. i.e




Radio waves are a kind of Electromagnetic Radiation and thus, they move at the speed of light. Speed of light is around 300,000,000 m/s.
So if you place your mouse at a distance of 1 meter from your mouse receiver, there would be a lag of 1/300,000,000 seconds.

But this off course depends on the quality of mouse that you are using too. In cheaper quality wireless mouses which are made of cheaper materials, you would obviously experience some amount of lag.






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arcticbeerPM
#6
Jun 30, 2017 8:40 AM
Joined: May 22, 2017
Posts: 46
robin3sk wrote:
It's a similar theory that applies to input lag with wireless devices; wireless mouse, keyboard etc.

Most wireless mice use radio frequency (RF) technology to communicate information to your computer.
And Radio Frequency is in the range of around 3 kHz to 300 GHz.
1 Hertz ( 1Hz ) is one full oscillation in one second. i.e




Radio waves are a kind of Electromagnetic Radiation and thus, they move at the speed of light. Speed of light is around 300,000,000 m/s.
So if you place your mouse at a distance of 1 meter from your mouse receiver, there would be a lag of 1/300,000,000 seconds.

But this off course depends on the quality of mouse that you are using too. In cheaper quality wireless mouses which are made of cheaper materials, you would obviously experience some amount of lag.




I'm not into science or that stuff lol...
But gj, thanks for explaining. I dont usee wireless devices. I'm getting a new PC soon and gonna prolly get use wired devices. and ethernet ofc

edit: I used the settings for my laptop.. thxz
Antarticbeer.